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Momentum Builds To Name Subway Stop After Late Argentine LGBT Activist

By | [email protected] | August 2, 2016 5:29pm

Carlos Jáuregui and late transgender activist Lohana Berkins
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There’s a petition going around on change.org to name the new Santa Fé station on the H line after Argentine LGBT activist Carlos Jáuregui. The initiative, that was initially put forward by representative Maximiliano Ferraro, was given the thumbs up in a tweet by city the city’s mayor, Rodríguez Larreta.

“Good idea, Maxi. We’re going to support the initiative in the Legislature and I hope that we’ll achieve this recognition.”

Jáuregui, the first president of the Argentine Homosexual Community (CHA), later founded the organization Gays for Civil Rights (GAYS DC), lead the first Gay and Lesbian Pride Parade in Buenos Aires, and fought for legal protection against discrimination based on sexual orientation in Buenos Aires.

Carlos Jáuregui and late transgender activist Lohana Berkins

Carlos Jáuregui and late transgender activist Lohana Berkins

This August 20th will mark the twentieth anniversary of his death; Jáuregui died at age 38 of AIDS. After being honored with a funeral procession from the Plaza de Mayo to the Congressional Palace, he was laid to rest in Chacarita cemetery. Naming the new station on the H after Jáuregui would be a way of honoring the activist’s struggle – a struggle that paved the way for Argentina to become a leader in Latin America, and the world, regarding LGBT rights.

Photo via infobae.com

Photo via infobae.com

The location of the subway station in question is relevant to Ferraro’s petition: it is situated on the corner of Puerreydón and Santa Fé. In the past, as the visibility of the Buenos Aires’ LGBT community increased – particularly in the 90’s – a large number of gay-friendly restaurants, bars, pubs, and night-clubs opened in the area, drawing large crowds of people. Santa Fé Avenue and its associated environs have been described as fundamental to the city’s LGBT history, and the subway station, that sits in the middle of it, could become a modern landmark to the neighborhood’s legacy.

“These people who question who I am and criticize me, undoubtedly, are garbage. But do I actually need the permission of others? If this is my wish, my life . . . who am I going to ask permission from to live it how I want to?”

Carlos Jáuregui