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Malvinas War ‘Teacher Soldier’ Identified After DNA Testing

By | [email protected] | June 5, 2018 8:07am

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The ongoing process to identify Argentine soldiers buried on the Malvinas Islands has resulted in another match, bringing the total number of identified soldiers to 92.

The Human Rights Secretariat has confirmed that it has identified the body of Julio Rubén Cao, originally from Ramos Mejía, who was killed in combat on June 10, 1982. Cao volunteered for military service and was known as the “Teacher Soldier” (Maestro Soldado) as he had been a primary school teacher prior to the war. He also wrote a letter to his students while on the islands.

Cao was identified using DNA samples taken from the Argentine cemetery on the islands, as part of a humanitarian agreement.

Human Rights Secretary Claudio Avruj with Delmira Cao after the family was informed of the identification. (Credit Human Rights Secretariat)

Human Rights Secretary Claudio Avruj with Delmira Cao after the family was informed of the identification. (Credit Human Rights Secretariat)

 

Last week, the body of Mario Antonio Cisnero was also identified as part of the efforts of the secretariat, the Argentine Forensic Anthropology Team (EAAF) and a laboratory in Córdoba. Cisnero, originally from Catamarca province, died on June 9, 1982 and was buried in the Argentine cemetery on the islands in a grave with a headstone that said “Argentine soldier known only to God.”

Cisnero was the first unknown soldier to be identified since a historic trip in March of this year to the islands, which allowed families of unidentified soldiers killed during the Malvinas War to pay tribute to their loved ones. The families also placed nameplates on the graves, 36 years after the war’s end.

Efforts to identify the unknown soldiers buried on the islands will continue.