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Articles by Maria Agustina Pardini

With January comes the heat (I know, you hadn’t noticed until I told you), vacations (for the lucky few), and a general much slower pace when it comes to, you know, doing stuff. So why not take advantage and use …

Bookworms, take note.

Here is another Bubble series exploring local literary options, but this time we are introducing contemporary Argentine female writers. Now that you have already dipped your toes into the Rioplatense bookish scene, you are fully ready to …

As part of The Bubble’s series exploring literary local options beyond Borges and Cortázar, here is a pack on some of Argentina’s greatest male writers. Switch the August wintry setting for a while and enjoy, dear bookworms!

RODOLFO FOGWILL

Resultado de imagen para fogwill

Before …

Bookworms, Rejoice! Feria del Libro 2017 is officially open! The most awaited literary festival is on now until May 27th and includes a rather awesome looking lineup.

Some of the international guests are Carlos Ruiz Zafón, John Katzenbach, Arturo Pérez-Reverte,

The extensive cultural scene that Buenos Aires has on offer, allowing residents and tourists alike to profit from the city’s generous artistic agenda — one in which cultural cafés play a crucial role. It turns out that a cup of …

Feeling the need to escape the noisy chaos synonymous with living in Buenos Aires?  The city’s public libraries emerge as potential saviours to the constant honking and bustle occurring on the street. Here is a list of some of the

Buenos Aires has this way of bringing creativity out in people. If you’re feeling the creative itch, one of the city’s many writing and literature courses might be just the thing to assuage your need to create. It could also …

Argentina’s literary foundation started when a group of pen-wielding intellectuals decided to free themselves from Spain’s cultural legacy and focus instead on the French romantic literary movement, adopting it and going back to their rather neglected cultural roots: el campo

Argentina has always been influenced by the Anglo Saxon culture. Maybe it’s because of the wave of English immigration in the 19th century, or maybe it has something to do the neoliberal policy decisions of the late 90s opening the …

Beating the chill in Buenos Aires these days can be really hard, but with the help of literature and its enormous capacity of always helping us find a way out of desolate situations, the struggle could get a little more …