Photo via Perfil

Whether you were glued to the Roland Garros tournament, sucked in  by the Tony Awards or battling an intense cold along with the rest of the city, nobody really expects you to keep up with the real news over the weekend, right?

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Except The Bubble. That’s what the Weekend Roundup up is here for. Enjoy!

  • The kidnap of a retired, married couple, Braulio Herrera and Josefa Carrozeri, made headlines over the weekend as it ended in tragedy — they died after the car they were being transported in crashed into a tree. The police had allegedly intercepted the kidnapping, as the vehicle had been reported stolen, and were chasing them when the accident happened. Herrera and Carrozeri died immediately, as did one of the three kidnappers. The incident happened in the Buenos Aires neighborhood of Temperley, where the couple had grown up and lived together. There was a vigil and a march for them yesterday to protest against the lack of security: the mayor of the area, Martín Insaurralde, is being put on the spot.
Photo via Clarin
Photo via Clarin
  • Vice President Gabriela Michetti once again brought up the debate over the age at which people can be tried as adults after the government considered lowering it to just 14 years old. In an interview with Radio Mitre, Michetti said that she considered 14 years old to be a “reasonable” age and that she is convinced that “it is necessary to discuss the issue fully.””The Senate is preparing itself for that debate, we can’t use the excuse of problems with election dates [as there are elections this year],” she continued. As Michetti indicates, the debate over new legislation on the matter somewhat fizzled out at the beginning of the election year as it is a highly controversial issue. Read more: Government Considering Lowering The Age People Can Be Tried As Adults To 14
  • In San Juan province, the Argentine rugby team Los Pumas lost to England national side 34-38 on Saturday. It was the fourth defeat in a row for the Pumas, the seventh losing to the English side, but that wasn’t the worst part: a few England supporters decided to decorate a corner of the stands with a big flag emblazoned with the words “There’s some corner of foreign field that’s forever English,” alluding to the 1982 conflict. Reactions did not take long to become apparent as the crowd booed and jeered at the England fans, who were forced to take it down.
Photo via Minuto Uno
Photo via Minuto Uno
  • The Argentine Chamber of Small and Medium-Sized Businesses (CAME) released a study on Sunday warning of the rise in illegal businesses: in the month of May, there were 86,728 illegal stands around the country. 465 cities were surveyed and the CAME study indicates that they make around  AR$ 7.1 billion a month (that’s if you update the original figure from May, 5.9 billion, due to inflation). The figures show a significant increase in the past nine months, allegedly due to increased prices for having a legal stall at a fair in the City of Buenos Aires: in addition, multiple crackdowns on illegal trade have meant that illegal businesses have moved towards the provinces (specifically to less regulated areas).
Photo via Ambito
Photo via Ambito
  • Carolina Píparo has hinted that she could become a candidate for the government coalition in the legislative elections for the province of Buenos Aires later this year. Píparo became known to the public in 2010, when she lost her baby after being shot outside a bank in an attack known as a salidera (people are targeted on leaving the bank after withdrawing money). She was nine months pregnant at the time of the attack. Yesterday afternoon on the Mirtha Legrand show, Píparo said she “would put [herself] forward because it’s important to have the vote, to go beyond [just] having a voice” although she clarified that she had not yet “received a concrete proposal.” Since her attack, Píparo has been at the forefront of protesting against crime and impunity in the country.
  • The head of the first Argentine expedition to the South Pole on land, General Jorge Edgar Leal, died aged 96 on Saturday evening in Buenos Aires. With no maps to guide him through the unknown territory, he led a team of nine for a month and a half on “Operation 90 – South Pole” which reached its goal on December 10, 1965. In a 2014 interview, Leal said that “Planting a little mast with the [Argentine] flag in the southernmost extreme of the planet gave me the biggest emotion of my life.”
Photo via Los Andes
Photo via Los Andes

Go forth and show yourselves to be well informed, my loyal Monday readers!