Photo via Infobae

So, the weekend was sunny and you listened to your Spotify “Wake Up!!” playlist on the way to work this morning instead of catching up on the news. It happens to the best of us.

Gif via Giphy
Gif via Giphy

Except for The Bubble, who will now dutifully lay out what happened this weekend. Enjoy!

  • President Mauricio Macri was interviewed last night by journalist and TV presenter Luis Majul for his Sunday show La Cornisa. Many a topic was covered (feel free to check out the full interview below) and you’ll be hearing fragments from it throughout the day. For example, if the holdouts agreement is not approved by Congress, Macri said that the only other options are “austerity or hyperinflation.” Nice Sunday pick-me-up, Mac.

  • Another thing that Macri anticipated was that Cristobal Lopez’s assets will be seized: he’s the businessman that owns Grupo Indalo and is known as the “Tsar of Gambling” which, you know, isn’t shady at all. The seizure will be carried out by the national tax collection agency (AFIP) because the government wants to avoid having him declare bankruptcy and not paying his AR $8 billion debt accumulated over the past few years. Yikes.
Photo via Mendoza Post
Photo via Mendoza Post
Telefe and Canal 13 now have the broadcasting rights for matches played by Boca, River, Independiente and Racing. Photo via NCN
Telefe and Canal 13 now have the broadcasting rights for matches played by Boca, River, Independiente and Racing. Photo via NCN
  • Remember that during the election campaigns both Macri and Victory Front’s (FpV) Daniel Scioli’s hashtags became first and third Trending Topics worldwide? No? Well, anyway, the Vice President for Twitter Latin America, Guilherme Ribenboim, stated that the region is the fastest growing globally and that Argentina is particularly important within that market.
Photo via Argentina Noticias
Photo via Argentina Noticias
  • Meanwhile, in Brazil, protests shook 438 cities asking for the impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff as well as the imprisonment of her predecessor and political mentor, Lula da Silva. This is relevant to Argentina not only because of the political implications of a crisis of this scale in its main regional ally, but it would seem that while some Brazilians want less of Dilma, they want more of Macri. Who’d have thought?
Photo via Infobae
Photo via Infobae

Go forth, my loyal Monday readers! Show yourselves to be awake (thanks to Spotify and caffeine) and well informed (thanks to The Bubble). Until next week!