Foto Via: San Luis 24 Noticias

The tickets for the midterm are out, meaning that we will be eating, breathing and sleeping elections until October 22. The vote is taking place across the country, but as with every midterm election, many will only pay attention to what happens in the Buenos Aires Province’s senatorial run.

Since the territory holds 38 percent of the national population and the result is typically used as a litmus test for how well the current administration’s policies are landing with voters, it’s no wonder that most of the parties focus their efforts there. Keeping that in mind, we put together a list of everyone who will be trying to get a seat in Congress, or at least boost their political profile ahead of the 2019 election.

Political rockstars resurged, parties have split, and coalitions developed. Welcome to another Argentine election cycle.

Foto Via: La Nación
Foto Via: La Nación

Cambiemos: the current administration’s party has a lot at stake here, as these elections are widely considered to be an indicator of whether they will be able to get a second term in 2019. Education Minister Esteban Bullrich and head of the Acumar, the entity in charge of tackling the pollution in the Riachuelo river, Gladys González, will be representing Cambiemos.

Unidad Ciudadana: Former President, Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner is throwing her hat in the ring for a political comeback. After her former Interior and Transportation Minister, Florencio Randazzo, refused to let her be the only candidate in the Justicialist Party, the former President decided to create her own and will directly compete in October’s general Senate racem, joined by one of her former Foreign Ministers (who she fired) Jorge Taiana.

1 Pais: The party will be led by Sergio Massa along his new sidekick Margarita Stolbizer. This merger presents exactly what 1Pais wants to provide the people; a third option that’s in between the government and Kirchnerism. The elections’ main question is whether they will be able to garner a considerable amount of support they need in order to grab a seat at the table.

PJ: With the former president willingly out of the picture, the traditional Peronist party (PJ) will be holding its own primary election to determine who will be running as head Senator. Competing in the internal elections will be Florencio Randazzo and Gastón Yañez.

Foto Via: La Izquierda Diario.
Foto Via: La Izquierda Diario.

FIT (Frente de Izquierda y de los Trabajadores): FIT has presented Néstor Pitrola, a current National Deputy, as their candidate for National Senator. For their leading Deputy candidate, they’ve decided to go for Nicolás Del Caño, who was also a national deputy.

Foto Via: La Nueva. Vilma Ripoll.
Foto Via: La Nueva. Vilma Ripoll.

Frente Creo (Proyecto Sur): The party is a merger of the political fronts Proyecto Sur, Pueblo en Marcha and the Partido Social. Their candidate for Head Senator is Pino Solanas with Josefina Pouso by his side.

Izquierda al Frente: Their head Senator, Vilma Ripoll, is a nurse, a socialist, and the party’s new candidate.

Frente Socialista y Popular: They are staunch critics of the party Cambiemos.  The party has emerged from a merger between the party Unidad Popular and the Partido Socialista. Their leading Senator is Víctor de Gennaro followed up by Gabriela Troiano.