The ink is barely dry on Michel Temer’s presidency, but his administration has already had plenty of time to embarrass itself both domestically and internationally. The G20 Summit was not kind to Temer, who was sworn in as the country’s leader last week. And following his first international appearance as Brazil’s official president, independence day also was no picnic to the new leader. At the very least, this must all be wonderful inspiration for Temer’s poetry.

Temer listed as “Brazilian leader” in G20 summit invitation

Photo: CCTV
Photo: CCTV

The official G20 Summit invitation named the likes of President Mauricio Macri of Argentina, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of Canada and other world leaders among those attending. And then, there was “Brazilian leader.” Not President Michel Temer of Brazil, not Acting President Michel Temer of Brazil, just the nameless “Brazilian leader.” In fairness, the list was published on August 28 — three days before Temer officially assumed office, though he has been acting president since May 12. Being listed as “Brazilian leader” is at least better than the joke that circulated online that Chinese officials had introduced him as “Mr. Fora Temer.” Many, including Telesur, reported it as fact. As befitting someone who doesn’t even have a name, Temer stood awkwardly off to the side in the G20 group shot. Dilma fans will gleefully note that at last year’s summit, she got to stand front and center.

Temer goes shoe shopping

Photo: Folha
Photo: Folha

Temer is a busy man, but he still needs shoes. And so while in China for G20, he spent some time shopping in Hangzhou for a new pair of shoes, producing an awkward photo op that seems to have come straight out of an episode of Veep. The Brazilian industry, which has long been fighting against cheap imports from China, was none too happy. He also bought an electronic dog that speaks Chinese. Although easily mocked, the purchases may have been a preview of Temer’s future as a trendsetter — Chinese shoppers went and bought the same pair as the president after spotting him at the store. As Brazilian press was sure to note, he spent in total around R$580 (US$180).

Temer estimating around 40 people would attend protests against him

Photo: Reuters
Photo: Reuters

When interviewed at the G20 summit, Temer downplayed the significance of protests against him, dismissing them as no more than “40, 50, 100 people.” However, in São Paulo alone anywhere from 50,000 to 100,000 protesters turned up at a protest on Paulista Avenue on Sunday afternoon, not to mention the protests that haven taken place in Rio de Janeiro and other Brazilian cities since Temer took power. But sure, by Temer’s logic, that’s a drop in the bucket compared to the Brazilian population of more than 200 million.

José Serra calling the “Fora Temer” protests “mini mini mini mini mini mini”

Photo: Sputnik News
Photo: Sputnik News

You know how if you say something enough times, you start to believe it’s true? We suppose that’s the tactic all of Temer’s cabinet has chosen to take. When asked about the protests against Temer’s presidency, Foreign Relations Minister José Serra called the protests, “Mini mini mini mini mini mini.” That’s not just one mini, that’s six. That means very small. Very, very, very, very, very, very small. Get back to him when they’ve reached Caracas proportions of one million people (but keep the tear gas coming).

Temer gets booed at Independence Day parade

Photo: DN
Photo: DN

It is unfortunate, to say the least, that Temer’s first week as Brazil’s official president happened to coincide with Brazil’s independence day, meaning he’d be forced to be paraded in front of the very people who have not been shy about expressing that they’re really not his biggest fans. Most shockingly, some of the people who booed him were actually in the VIP section, meaning guests of the presidency. During the annual military parade in Brasília, Temer also opted not to wear the Brazilian presidential sash and rode in a closed car rather than the traditional open top car.

The Google Chrome plug-in that changes “Michel Temer” to “Temer Golpista”

Photo: Buzzfeed
Photo: Buzzfeed

Michel Temer basically admitted he didn’t mind being called a “golpista,” (which loosely translates to “coupist”) and so the internet responded accordingly. Now, you can download a plug-in for your web browser that replaces all mentions of “Michel Temer” with “Temer Golpista.” We’re just waiting for the plug-in that changes his name to Mr. Fora Temer.

Temer gets booed at the Paralympics Opening Ceremony

Photo: Huffington Post
Photo: Huffington Post

September 7 was not a great day for Michel Temer. It started with protesters booing him during Independence Day parade in Brasília, and ended with more boos from attendees of the Paralympic Opening Ceremony. To add insult to injury, the president of the Rio Organizing Committee Carlos Arthur Nuzman called Temer Brazil’s “acting president,” a term no longer accurate since Dilma’s impeachment. Maybe Temer will share his feelings on the trying day in a future poem.

Commenters flooding the G20 Facebook page with “Fora Temer” comments

Photo: Facebook
Photo: Facebook

Though it was likely intended as a space to promote the summit, the G20 China Facebook page has turned into a sounding board for anti-Temer and pro-Dilma comments. A photo of Temer shaking hands with Chinese President Xi Jinping has close to 200,000 comments ranging from vomiting emoticons (part of what is referred to as a vomitaçao, which is a concerted effort to fill pages with that vomiting emoticonto “Fora Temer” in various languages. Even innocuous images of Chinese landscapes and food cannot escape hundreds of comments calling Temer a golpista and naming Dilma as the real president of Brazil.