The Casa Rosada presidential palace. (Photo/Wikipedia)
The Casa Rosada presidential palace. (Photo/Wikipedia)

For the second time in three months, a wayward car has temporarily breached the security measures surrounding Casa Rosada and driven precariously close to the government house.

In the early hours of Tuesday morning (2 AM to be exact) security officers at the presidential palace received a surprising visit as a gray Suzuki Fan containing six individuals (one with a warrant out for his arrest) entered the proximity of Casa Rosada and crossed the chains and cement piles blocking off the area. The car entered from the direction of Balcarce Street by Yrigoyen, and continued for 30 meters before authorities managed to detain the group.

Once under custody, the occupants of the car claimed that they were solely heading to the Puerto Madero casino, which even though is in the general direction of where the car was traveling, is still nearly 3 km away. The group held steadfast that they never intended any form of attack on the Casa Rosada, but just merely wanted to return to Rivadavia avenue.

After a few hours, five of the six individuals were released from custody. Fernando Matías Alvez, Alejandro Gonzáles, José Luis Vázques, Julio Fernando Ramos and Gustavo Alvez were allowed to leave. The sixth individual, however, 19-year-old Juan Moreira, remained in custody as there was a previous warrant out for his arrest as well as a traffic ban on the Suzuki Fan being driven.

This whole incident is a bit confusing and wholly underwhelming. How does one manage to avoid the authorities for so long only to to crash into the lap of the government? Driving through the cement blockers of the Casa Rosada is nearly equivalent to presenting oneself on platter with waving arms and bursting fireworks that say, “Hey! I’m over here!”

In fact, in the past week the security measures surrounding central focuses of the city have recently been increased. The presence of police patrols in areas like downtown Buenos Aires, around the Plaza de Mayo and Casa Rosada, the Banco Nación and the Houses of the Province of Buenos Aires and Chubut (in relation to the case of Santiago Maldonado’s disappearance), have all received a hefty boosting. These changes spurred as a reaction to incidents like last Thursday at the Buenos Aires Senate during a march for Santiago Maldonado involving a molotov cocktail, as well as the driving incident from last June involving a handicapped driver.