Photo via TN

Clarín Journalist Pablo de León assures in an article published today that former President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner has changed her mind about decriminalizing abortion, and would vote in favor of it, should she have to. Although former Kirchnerite deputy Diana Conti posited she might vote in favor shortly after the subject started dominating the news cycle – following the government’s announcement about not intending to block it in Congress, De León assures the eventual favorable vote is now a given.

According to De León, Fernández, who throughout the eight years of her presidency blocked the debate of the bill that is currently being discussed by four commissions in the Lower House, changed her mind after being convinced by different women from her inner circle who actively promote decriminalization.

The names mentioned are Juliana Di Tullio, leader of the Frente Para la Victoria caucus in the Lower House during her presidencies; Mayra Mendoza, a deputy who is also part of the Kirchnerite youth group La Cámpora; and especially, her 28-year-old daughter, Florencia. Cristina’s son Máximo is not mentioned as someone who helped sway the former President’s stance, but the deputy has also spoken in favor of decriminalization and partook in different demonstrations in favor of it.

An eventual statement or vote in favor from the former President would be likely met with accusations of opportunism, as the debate largely comes as a result of the momentum the movement to decriminalize abortion is having.

When consulted about her thoughts regarding the former President’s stance, FIT City legislator Myriam Bregman criticized her reluctance to allow the discussion of the issue during her tenures. “A female president, who in her speeches made sure to say ‘todos y todas,’ extremely correct in the manners… but when it came to actual content, she denied women the right to legal, free, and safe abortion.”

However, unless she decides to make her intentions public on her own, the former President might not have to set a stance. The bill introduced by the Campaign for Legal, Free and Safe abortion first has to make it through the commissions and then the Lower House. And it is uncertain whether it will garner enough votes in both instances.