(Photo via Complejo Teatral Buenos Aires)

If you were to think about what a traditional play might look like, “Miedo” would be anything but that. Without physical props, or a full physical cast, “Miedo” smashes all of the typical structures, themes, and genres to be a unique, creative, and alternative piece of theatrical art.

Created from the union of Argentine art duo “Mondongo” (Juliana Laffitte and Manuel Mendhana) along with Catalan singer-songwriter Albert Pla, “Miedo” is a fusion play of cinema, virtual arts, theater, and song produced by Spanish production company “Nueve Ojos.”

Almost impossible to categorize or put into just one genre, the play shines a light on what we define or consider to be fear. Guided by Pla, the audience is taken on a journey through a fantastical world full of all things that typically make children and adults afraid.

(Photo via Complejo Teatral de Buenos Aires)
(Photo via Complejo Teatral de Buenos Aires)

 

Tengo miedo de todo,” (I’m scared of everything), begins the play; it is an expression that is heard frequently throughout. Pla tells us of his fears, which range from darkness to the circus. Sometimes humorous and sometimes frightening, “Miedo” strikes a balance between being darkly comic and terrifyingly thrilling.

As the only live actor in the play, Pla interacts with the changing digital scenery. Cleverly designed interactions show him taken on a rollercoaster, climbing or running, all without a single prop aside from the scenery projections onto the screen behind him.

Pla’s character is portrayed as a somewhat broken man who is sensitive to the surrounding world and is therefore essentially afraid of everything. The piece adopts a circular structure, neither really properly beginning nor ending. “Miedo” is more about exploring fear as a concept rather than a play with a beginning or an ending.

“Miedo” is full of the unexpected, which keeps the audience both engaged and perplexed. One moment Pla is singing about his fear of contemporary arts, which is only slightly ironic; the next, an image of a headless girl being feasted upon by a giant beast is splashed unexpectedly across the screen, a jarring change. Filled with the slightly outlandish, the play’s ability to shock and surprise makes it an intriguing and entertaining experience.

(Photo via Complejo Teatral Buenos Aires)
(Photo via Complejo Teatral Buenos Aires)

 

The audience is encouraged to explore their own fears. In one scene, Pla, alone on stage in total darkness, asks that the audience close their eyes and think about their deepest darkest fears. The effect is slightly eerie, sitting in a pitch black theater, listening only to his asking us to confront our fears, the atmosphere is more than a little creepy. Although, this is precisely the point.

Visually, “Miedo” scores top marks. The graphics created by duo Mondongo are visually astounding and hold the audience in a hypnotic trance. Pla’s crooning can occasionally break this state and dilute the play’s power, but overall the two sets of creatives marry well. Recommended if you’re looking to see a play that’s a little more alternative and experimental.

“Miedo” is on until March 11 | Tickets are AR $125 – 250 | Teatro Regio | Avenida Córdoba 6056 | Click here for reservations and more info.