Photo via La Nación

President Mauricio Macri had an extensive sit-down interview with journalist Luis Majul yesterday on his political TV show “La Cornisa.” For 53 minutes, Macri talked about most of the issues that dominate the current political (and national) conversation: the debate about the decriminalization of abortion, the state of the Argentine economy – especially the increases in utility bills and transportation fares, as well as inflation rates – and even the chants against him in public events, among others.

You can watch the interview below, along with a few highlights of what he said (and some context to help you understand, courtesy of The Bubble. You’re welcome.)

ON THE ABORTION DEBATE

“To think that debating abortion is being used as a smokescreen [to divest attention from other pressing issues] is to underestimate Argentines. I have already said that I am pro life and I hope we will have an enriching debate. I will not veto the law in case it is passed, I will respect the will of Congress.”

INCREASES IN UTILITY BILLS AND PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION

“It is as tremendous at it is inevitable. If we kept avoiding paying what we have to for public services, the frequency of power outages would have increased. People get upset, and they have reasons to, but they still pay less of what a Uruguayan or a Chilean pay for them. I have spent nights trying to figure out whether there was another way, but if we don’t have energy, we will not grow.”

CHANTS AGAINST HIM IN PUBLIC EVENTS (ESPECIALLY FOOTBALL MATCHES)

“If there is someone who understands the passion that football generates it’s me [making reference to the fact that he presided Boca Juniors before getting into politics]. I thought the chants were funny and creative. However, that does not mean I don’t think there is a political intent [from his opponents] behind them. It was not spontaneous.”

THE COURT OF APPEALS RULING THAT ORDERED MEDIA AND BUSINESS TYCOON CRISTOBAL LOPEZ TO BE RELEASED FROM PRISON WHILE HE AWAITS TRIAL

“[The ruling] outraged me – same as many other Argentines. We will appeal through the AFIP [tax collecting agency].” The President also expressed concern over how López went from being accused of defrauding the state to a simple tax evasion. “He charged a tax on the AFIP’s behalf, but instead of transferring that money to the agency he used it to buy other things. That is a criminal action, absolutely,” he said.

THE ONGOING AND INTENSIFYING DEBATE ABOUT POLICE BRUTALITY, SPARKED AFTER THE SO-CALLED ‘CHOCOBAR CASE’

“My main responsibility is to look over the Argentine people. I can’t do that if we don’t take care of those who protect us, if we don’t admire those who risk their lives for us. I feel like Chocobar acted in the way he had to. I acted as a citizen. I hope I had influence over the judges so they protect us from crime.”

HIGH INFLATION RATE

“I thought inflation would come down faster, but this year’s rate will be lower than the one from the year before this one, and the trend will continue during the following years.”

REELECTION PLANS

“I have made a commitment with the Argentine people, and if they believe I have to stay in office for another term, I will do it. It is fundamental for the future of the City and Province of Buenos Aires that [Horacio Rodríguez] Larreta and [María Eugenia] Vidal be reelected. I will work for that. The [development of the] Buenos Aires Province is key for the future of Argentina.”