The most recent photo of Martín Lanatta after being captured (Photo via sl24.com)
The most recent photo of Martín Lanatta after being captured (Photo via sl24.com)

Martín Lanatta, one of the three convicts who escaped from the General Alvear prison at the end of last year, revealed today that a high-ranking officer from the Buenos Aires Province Penitentiary Service (SPB) called Jorge Mario Bolo helped him pull off the breakout that had the entire country going batshit crazy for three weeks before getting caught in a rice field in Santa Fe. This theory was suggested by many, as the prison is supposed to be the maximum security kind.

Lanatta provided these statements during a hearing with Federal Judge María Servini de Cubría, who is not investigating the escape itself, but the triple murder that put Lanatta in prison in the first place.

It’s important to clarify this because since Servini de Cubría is not in charge of investigating the escape, she didn’t follow through with a related line of questioning and only wrote down what the convict confessed of his own volition. However, this declaration might compel those looking into the escape to follow up on this new revelation.

You may recall that the triple crime and its repercussions were almost as controversial as the escape that followed, since last year Lanatta accused then Cabinet Chief Aníbal Fernández of being the mastermind behind the murders. In return, Fernández (who was then running for governor of Buenos Aires Province) said this accusation was part of a smear campaign carried out by his enemies. Today, this political incident is considered one of the main reasons why he was defeated by current Buenos Aires Province Governor María Eugenia Vidal in the gubernatorial elections.

Even though it was not strictly related to the crime, Lanatta also confessed to the judge that the escape had two goals: To destabilize the SPB and to get him to go back on his accusations against Fernández.

When explaining how he was helped, the convict said that Bolo, the former head of the “center south zone complex” (whatever that means) of the prison, told him how and where to escape with his brother Cristian and Víctor Schillaci, also sentenced to life for the murders of Sebastián Forza, Damián Ferrón and Leopoldo Bina, and for which Ibar Esteban Pérez Corradi, considered to be the intellectual author of the murders, remains at large since he managed to avoid capture in 2012. (By the way, in Argentina, being sentenced to life in prison doesn’t actually mean for life, as an inmate can get out of jail after serving 20 to 35 years, depending on the circumstance.)

All three fugitives who escaped from the General Alvear prison in December last year. Photo via primeraedicion.com.ar
All three fugitives who escaped from the General Alvear prison in December last year. Photo via primeraedicion.com.ar

Moreover, Lanatta added that a high-ranking guard from the General Alvear prison gave them wood and paint to make the gun replicas they used to threaten the already low number of guards at the time of escaping.

Finally, Lanatta did provide some statements about the case for which he was being questioned: He said Pérez Corradi had no connection to the murders whatsoever and that he had no idea where he is. To be fair, the federal justice has no idea where he is either, as the closest they ever got to him was arresting someone who looked like him. Seriously. To Aníbal Fernández’s eternal despair, Lanatta did repeat his accusations against him. No favorable statements for you, Aníbal.

Martín and Cristian Lanatta and Víctor Schillaci escaped the General Alvear maximum security prison in Buenos Aires Province on December 27th 2015 (a feat they accomplished in 15 minutes armed with the aforementioned, totally real looking wooden gun). The men were serving life sentences for the 2008 “General Rodríguez triple crime” in which they murdered members of their drug trafficking organization who were allegedly planning on ditching the business to start their own methamphetamine manufacturing trade with their former partners’ contact list.