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Now there are no doubts. Argentina joined the (so far small) group of countries that have ratified the Paris climate change deal when it published it today in the Official Bulletin. Earlier this month Congress approved the deal, so this was just a formality. Argentina has now joined the likes of Brazil, China and the United States to ratify the Paris Agreement, which aims to put the brakes on global warming.

Brazil ratified the agreement in Brasilia on September 3, soon after China and the USA both ratified the agreement.

The Paris Agreement of the United Nations seeks to “limit average temperature rise to 2 Degrees Celsius compared to pre-industrial levels.” The Paris Agreement needs to be ratified by at least 55 countries representing 55 percent of global emissions in order to move forward. So far, 28 of the 197 have ratified, accounting for 39 percent of global emissions.

Argentina has pledged to cut emissions 15 percent by 2030, but saying that can rise to 30 percent if it receives international support. That is likely to change in the not-too-distant future as President Mauricio Macri’s administration has said it wants to increase its commitment to the deal.

Argentina currently accounts for 0.9 percent of greenhouse gas emissions, compared to 2.5 percent for Brazil. Comparably, China accounts for 20 percent of global emissions, while the U.S. accounts for 18 percent.

On Wednesday, President Mauricio Macri will attend a high-level meeting of the United Nations on climate change in New York. At least 20 countries have said they will take advantage of the current U.N. General Assembly to ratify the deal leading experts to believe it will come into force by the end of the year.