Photo via Clarin

The candidacies for Octobers’ midterms are out and the Cambiemos coalition is already implementing its well-rehearsed strategy: to polarize itself against former President Cristina Kirchner, and draw a comparison between the dark past they claim she represents and the long-term growth the Macri administration says they are bringing in.

The Macri administration has regularly resorted to this kind rhetoric since the 2015 presidential election’s campaign trail. They built off this line of thought while in office justifying many of their unpopular measures as being a necessary step in dealing with this “Kirchner inheritance.”

That’s why it’s no surprise that now that the former president is running for a Senate seat, the government’s representatives are adapting their message, warning that her return to the political scene could jeopardize the administration’s quest to get foreign investment.

In an interview with Radio Mitre, Treasury Minister Nicolás Dujovne said that Fernández’s presence “brings back to the limelight the great debate about the Argentine economy, which is whether we want to back to the past policies’, to populism, which slowly consumed all that we built, lying with [innaccurate] statistics and generated poverty, or if we want to continue building this Argentina that thinks about the future, which implements tough measures that are aimed at improving the lives of all Argentines.”

“Obviously, when an investor or someone who is thinking of setting a factory here see the possibility that Argentina may go to the policies of the past that have harmed us so much, they doubt. And that brings us the debate: whether we will look to the future or the past,” he added.

Nonetheless, Dujovne assured that competing against the former president “helps to value” what the government does, and although “sometimes it makes mistakes, it’s governing thinking of the next generations.” “While we have differences when it comes to the way of implementing these measures, the better part of society shares this mindset. But when we see the shadows of the past, it’s normal that some worry,” he finished.

“While we have differences when it comes to the way of implementing these measures, the better part of society shares this mindset. But when we see the shadows of the past, it’s normal that some worry,” he finished.

So far, statements from the representatives of the former president’s new electoral front are confirming the government’s strategy was the way to go. Hours before being confirmed as the Citizens’ United Front head of Deputies in the Buenos Aires Province, economist Fernanda Vallejos said in a radio interview that “corruption during the Kirchner administration is something that the media makes up.” The rhetoric war is on its way, and each camp appears to be sticking to their playbooks.