By now you have probably already heard that the new season of Jorge Lanata’s infamous “Periodismo para Todos” (PPT) show began a few Sundays ago. And not much has changed since last year: he’s is as anti-Kirchnerite as ever, his investigative journalism continues to focus on government corruption, and the first 60 minutes of the show are utter crap, since his writers try too hard (and fail) to create a “fun” dynamic that borrows elements from Saturday Night Live and Real Time with Bill Maher.

During that first hour – mostly a mixture of stand-up comedy and skits involving celebrities and impersonators – he makes fun of several political leaders, including Cabinet Chief and former Chaco governor Jorge Capitanich, who offers a live press conference at the Casa Rosada every morning at 8 am so it doesn’t feel like the administration is up there, hidden in their ivory (pink?) tower.

If you turn on the TV at 8 in the morning, you will probably see something like this:

 

Boring, no?

Anyway, for quite some time now, many have insisted that Jorge Capitanich looks just like Oriana Junco (formerly known as Oggi Junco back when she was a man,) one of the so-called mediaticos that regularly show up on our TV screens and engage in fist fights and sex-ridden scandals that you’re never quite sure whether they are staged or not. Whatever the case may be, the producers of PPT decided that it would be a good idea to mock the Cabinet Chief by creating a skit in which Junco shows up dressed up just like him and has to deal with the annoying questions coming from the Casa Rosada press corps. After a few seconds of inconvenient questions, Fauxpitanich abruptly ends the press conference, takes her clothes off and starts dancing. Like this:

 

Or like this:

 

 

Maybe if I were drunk I would consider those videos to be mildly amusing, and that’s just because those backup dancers seem to be extremely into their performances. But generally speaking the skits are just terrible. However, just because they lack a serious quota of hilarity, that doesn’t mean people will not find it offensive.

Enter a bunch of Kirchnerite legislators from the Chaco province (where Capitanich is from) who yesterday voted and passed a resolution “strongly condemning” the skit, since they consider it to be “an insult to the office of the Cabinet Chief” as well as his “good name and honor.”

“We condemn these daring moves by this insulting kind of pseudo-journalism against the institutions of democracy and that makes use of its constitutional protection to engage in an unstoppable affront against men and women in public office.”

Sounds epic, doesn’t it? Also “good name and honor?” What is this, 1838? Jesus, people. I guess everyday life in Chaco must be pretty uneventful if legislators need to focus on such a dumb bill. I could even support a resolution condemning it because it’s just bad in every possible way but not because it’s “offensive”. I don’t think it offends anyone, except for these 16 legislators who are no doubt trying too hard to make Capitanich like them.

But the big reveal came this morning, when news about the resolution began spreading on Twitter. And you know ruthless the Twitter people can be. In an unexpected turn of events, the Cabinet Chief used the microblogging site to say he was in fact cool with Junco impersonating him:

 

 

 

 

 “I do not agree with the passing of a resolution that condemns a comedy skit poking fun at me. I believe humor is a fundamental ingredient in any society and I deeply believe in freedom of speech and freedom of the press. It is necessary to cultivate tolerance and respect humor in all its expressions.”

 

Well, I do not always agree with you sir. But in this case I couldn’t be more supportive.