Buenos Aires is never lacking in activities and the new Beat exhibition is another one to add to stick on the list and what’s more… it’s absolutely free! The exhibit kicks off Wednesday (March 22) at 7 PM in the Museo del libro y de la lengua, and will showcase a collaboration of works attributed to the Argentine Beat movement which arrived to Buenos Aires in the 60s.

The Beat movement started in North America in the 50s as a literary movement, praising portrayals of the human self above the materialistic world and standard narrative values. Involved were many prolific writers such as Jack Kerouac, William S. Burroughs, Allen Ginsberg and Neal Cassady. The movement had a heavy influence on many musicians at the time, many of which went on to become global superstars. The Beatles, Bob Dylan and the Door’s Jim Morrison were amongst the bunch. In fact, the Beatles name was a brainchild inspired by the movement.

Travelling overseas the movement knocked on Argentina’s door during the 60s, hitting Buenos Aires first. Argentina’s equivalent movement had the same aims, to focus on remaining outside the commercial genres of the time. Writers and creatives like Ruy Rodriguez, Reynaldo Mariani, Néstor Sánchez, Gianni Siccardi, Poni Micharvegas and Sergio Mulet were amongst the spearheads in the country.

The movement’s pioneers aimed to portray their life through two groups: Opium and Sunda, with a strong emphasis on autobiographical works such as poetic memoirs. Music at this time was exciting too as the movement coincided with the birth of national rock and jazz at the time became an underlying theme to the movement’s sound.

On the cards at the the exhibition, “Déjalo Beat” will be a mixture of photographs, audiovisual records, magazines and old editions of key books. Kicking off tonight on the ground floor of the Museo del libra y de la lengua the exhibition will be available till Sunday, July 16th.

When

Wednesday March 22nd – Sunday July 16.

Where

Museo del libro y de la lengua (Avenida Las Heras 2555)

How much

Not a single peso