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The 2016 Latin America’s 50 Best listing has been unveiled, and once again the world’s eyes will be turning towards Argentina with nine of the country’s restaurants making the cut and finding a spot on this coveted ranking.

Moving from the 7th to the 9th position, Tegui is the only Argentine restaurant to make it into the Top 10 with Chef German Martitegui’s cuisine being acclaimed for its innovation and sophistication. Only four positions down the list is Fernando Rivarola’s El Baqueano who has once again managed to charm the jury with their use of rare autochthonous meats.

Traditional parrillas are also part of the country’s exalted restaurants starting with Don Julio who managed to jump from last year’s 45th place all the way into the 21st spot. It seems likely that the lines will be getting longer on the corner of Gurruchaga and Guatemala, but with such a dreamy entraña offer we won’t mind. Chef Juan Gaffuri and his dry aged beef cuts have granted Four Season’s Elena with the 31st position, while La Cabrera — another of Palermo’s favorite parrillas — moved from the 19th spot to number 33 on the list. 

facebook.com/elbaqueanorestaurante
facebook.com/elbaqueanorestaurante

 

Pura Tierra is making its comeback on the ranking occupying the 50th position after its brief disappearance last year. Chef Martin Molteni’s cooking techniques were rewarded for having a new vision of Argentine cuisine by going back to ancestral methods and using only local ingredients. Chila, led by the only Argentine woman on Latam’s 50 Best, was listed at the 35th place with Soledad Nardelli’s “passion for produce and pure culinary creativity” was once again celebrated. Aramburu occupies the 26th position in the listing, moving up two spots from last year. Its 12-course tasting menu was described as “an amalgamation of textures, flavors and aromas” by the 50 Best Academy while The Bubble’s Kevin Vaughn described it as “experiencing culinary art”.

The 9th Argentine restaurant to be featured in this year’s listing is no other than Francis Mallman’s — aka master of fire — 1884. As if we needed another excuse to plan a trip to Mendoza.

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Aramburu | Photo by Kevin Vaughn

What happened in the rest of the region?

This year again Peruvians dominate the listing proving Lima remains Latam’s gastronomic Queen. Central, Chef Virgilio Martinez’ restaurant is heading the ranks for the third year in a row, followed in the second place by Nikkei cuisine institution Maida, while celebrity chef Gastón Acurio and his coveted bistro Astrid y Gastón are listed at the 7th position.

While Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and Peru all have nine restaurants on the ranking, only one Argentine institution made it to the top 10. This was not the case with countries like Brazil. Featured on the second season of Netflix Chef’s Table, D.O.M, Alex Atala’s restaurant based in Sao Paulo, is listed in the third position. 5 spots down the list is Maní, another of Sao Paulo’s gastronomic jewels. The Mexican capital gets represented by Pujol and Quintonil, ranked 5th and 6th this year, while Basque inspired Biko closes the Top 10.

Alex Atala from D.O.M. in São Paulo (No.11) with Vladimir Mukhin from White Rabbit (No.18) | Photo via facebook.com/LatinAmericas50BestRestaurants/
Alex Atala from D.O.M. in São Paulo (No.11) with Vladimir Mukhin from White Rabbit (No.18) | Photo via facebook.com/LatinAmericas50BestRestaurants/

 

Colombia and Chile are represented by four restaurants respectively with Santiago’s Boragó (4th) and Bogota’s Leo (16th) being their best ranked representatives. Uruguay is represented by two establishments: El Parador La Huella (23) and Jean Paul Bondoux’ original La Bourgogne (46), while Bolivia and Paraguay join the rank with La Paz’s acclaimed Gustu (14) and Tierra Colorada Gastro (47) in Asunción.

The Latin America’s 50 Best listing is compiled by a jury of 250 independent food experts, writers and connoisseurs since 2013. You can access the full listing here