Flor and Paz from Fruto Estudio. (Photo via Fruto Estudio).

Paris, London, New York… Buenos Aires. Now that the city has officially cemented its place in the lineup of fashion capitals, with its own Fashion Week and a growing roster of promising young talent, it’s time to look at some of the hometown designers producing highly original work across Buenos Aires. From hand-hammered bronze jewelry and silk scarves to illustrators and fine leather goods, these are brands who strive to move away from mass consumerism in favor of a return to hand-crafted individual goods.

Do I need all these things? I mean, technically no. Do I want them all? Try and stop me. So long bank balance, it’s been nice knowing you.

 

Fruto Estudio

Liv Tyler, is that you? (Photo via Fruto Estudio).
Liv Tyler, is that you? (Photo via Fruto Estudio).

 

First on this list is Fruto. One glance at their beautifully curated Instagram will tell you why: it’s so perfect that I would like them to just run my entire life. The brainchild of two graphic designers, Paz, a bookbinder, and Flor, a ceramicist, Fruto began in 2015 as an exercise in designing objects and prints. They are constantly experimenting with different media, playing with materials and shapes in textiles, paper, and ceramics.

(Photo via Fruto Estudio).
(Photo via Fruto Estudio).

 

Fruto will make your life just that bit more aesthetic. Flor and Paz focus on making original and modern products, with the quality and finish that comes with being made by hand. They describe themselves as being “passionate about colors and prints,” a fascination that can be felt in each collection.

So. Beautiful. (Photo via Fruto Estudio).
So. Beautiful. (Photo via Fruto Estudio).

 

Our picks are the blue marbled-finish mate that dreams are made of, as well as the Matisse-esque printed scarves, which can also be used as hair ties, wall hangings, and be looped onto to your bag – perhaps a leather backpack from their recent collaboration with Facha (see below)?

(Photo via Fruto Estudio).
(Photo via Fruto Estudio).

 

The pañuelos of our dreams. (Photo via Fruto Estudio).
The pañuelos of our dreams. (Photo via Fruto Estudio).

 

Fruto can be found at El Salvador 4578 and in various pop-up stores, which the brand posts on its Instagram and Facebook accounts. The outside of the building is fairly nondescript but if you ring the doorbell, you’ll enter into an oasis of color and impossibly pretty things. If you can’t make it to either of those, they also have an online store because let’s face it, there is no greater luxury than shopping in your pajamas.

YEY House
El Salvador 4578, Timbre 2, Palermo
Wednesday to Saturday 3PM – 8PM

 

(Photo via Fruto Estudio).
(Photo via Fruto Estudio).

 

(Photo via Fruto Estudio).
(Photo via Fruto Estudio).

 

 

Facha

Now that you have your pañuelo, you’ll need something to artfully tie it to. Enter Facha, a brand of handmade leather accessories started four years ago by friends Santiago Lopes and Guillermo Sukiasian, the designers placing equal value on craftsmanship and aesthetics of their products.

Guillermo and Santiago. (Photo via Facha).
Guillermo and Santiago. (Photo via Facha).

 

They make use of the local leather industry to create simple, durable, and accessible products, with the focus always on the manufacturing process. This results in sleek items that fit perfectly into the minimalist style which has been de moda for the past couple of seasons. Their backpacks are particularly impressive: completely seamless, they’re timeless pieces that have me counting up my pesos – the mink mochila tres backpack is particularly tempting.

Bags for days. (Photo via Facha).
Bags for days. (Photo via Facha).

 

Facha is a brand that defines itself in direct opposition to big-business fashion. Rather, they consider their clients as “people who are seeking to escape from malls and mass consumption, who connect with the products that they consume in a different way, they seek them out, they value them, they understand them.” No pressure or anything.

(Photo via Facha).
(Photo via Facha).

 

You can buy from their online shop, which ships nationwide, but trust me, you would much rather go to their studio. Located in the heart of Villa Crespo, visitors are invited to immerse themselves in the experience, to chat with Lopes and Sukiasian and watch them work, to see the materials first hand, “and have a beer!” they add. Sign me up.

The studio. (Photo via Facha).
The studio. (Photo via Facha).

 

You can find Facha at the following locales:

Facha Studio
Serrano 73, Villa Crespo
Monday to Friday 12PM – 6PM / Thursday 12PM – 7PM
Saturday 12PM – 4PM

Sticotti
Godoy Cruz 1740, Palermo
Monday to Friday 11AM – 5PM
Saturday 12PM – 6PM

YEY House
El Salvador 4578, Timbre 2, Palermo
Wednesday to Saturday 3PM – 8PM

Blue Sheep
Cabello 3791 PB B, Palermo
Monday to Friday 10AM – 7PM
Saturday 11AM – 5PM

I call this look "trying not to get your belongings stolen on the Subte". (Photo via Facha).
I call this look “trying not to get your belongings stolen on the Subte”. (Photo via Facha).

 

(Photo via Facha).
(Photo via Facha).

 

 

Julieta Morten Joyeria

(Photo via Julieta Morten).
(Photo via Julieta Morten).

 

Earring are a big deal right now, but some of the more ostentatious tassel and bauble styles can leave you feeling decked out like a Christmas tree. No matter, because Julieta Morten’s jewelry fits the brief of both being eye-catchingly unique and seasonally appropriate, with handmade earrings, necklaces and bracelets in bronze and copper, so that you can deck yourself out to your heart’s content. If the devil is in the details then send me to Hell, because these accessories have got me lusting HARD.

Julieta Morten is one of the more elusive designers of the ones featured here, but managing to track down her pieces makes finding them all the sweeter – pinky promise!

Promesa de meñiques. (Photo via Julieta Morten).
Promesa de meñiques. (Photo via Julieta Morten).

 

Her hand motif pieces are particularly worth hunting down, whether the earrings or the wrap-around rings (cool-girl tattoos not included).

She is regularly featured at the monthly Juntas feria, aka the prettiest market in Buenos Aires, details of which can be found on their social media. The location changes regularly, but past ferias have been in Colegiales and Once. Additionally, certain pieces are stocked at Indio Shop and Flowers Maevia, while a brand new showroom called Hidra Tienda will be opening soon near Parque Centenario, stocking her pieces and many more – keep your eyes glued to their Instagram for more information.

(Photo via Julieta Morten).
(Photo via Julieta Morten).

 

Indio
Avenida Santa Fe 2729, Locales 43/44, First Floor, Recoleta
Tuesday to Saturday 3PM – 8PM

Flowers Maevia
San Telmo Market, Stall 144
Wednesday to Friday 11AM – 7PM
Saturday and Sunday 11AM – 8PM

 

(Photo via Julieta Morten).
(Photo via Julieta Morten).

 

(Photo via Julieta Morten).
(Photo via Julieta Morten).

 

 

Acento de Autor

(Photo via Acento de Autor).
(Photo via Acento de Autor).

 

Step away from the frankenshoes Acento de Autor are here to up your footwear game. Founded by Ana Muños and Aldana Torchia, the brand aims to deliver artisan-made, timeless shoes, using Argentine leather as their main material. You have to move fast though – each piece is made in limited quantities.

The sleek lines and contemporary look of the pieces belies the fact that these shoes are actually really pleasant to wear, thanks to a cushioned insole.

Executive realness.(Photo via Acento de Autor).
Executive realness.(Photo via Acento de Autor).

 

Their suede slippers with peekaboo cutouts are particularly pretty, although it’s the ‘business in the front, party in the back’ mules that have really caught my attention, especially as the weather starts to turn a little cooler.

Acento de Autor shoes are available to buy from their online store and from their boutique in Palermo, as well as from various pop-ups which are posted on their Instagram.

Vernna y Acento de Autor
Bonpland 1855, Palermo
Monday – Saturday 12PM – 8PM

 

 

Josefina Schargorodsky

(gif via Josefina Schargorodsky).
(gif via Josefina Schargorodsky).

 

Now that your shoes are on point, you have a dope bag, and you are draped in silky scarves, it’s time to think about adorning your home. Look to Josefina Schargorodsky, who has been a professional illustrator for the past four years but has been honing her style for her entire life.

 

Her sweet and feminine illustrations are inspired by her surroundings, her daily life, and the city of Buenos Aires; she also draws upon old photos and the work of other artists. You can particularly note the influences of Matisse, Rousseau, and Botticelli in her use of shape and color.

More than the other designers featured here, Schargorodsky’s work is then used in magazines, products, textiles, and books produced by a myriad of other brands, such as Notoria Indumentaria, Oliverta, and La Rosa botanicals. Her online shop can be found on her website, and her products can be bought in bookshops, in the UNION art gallery, and from certain brands such as Monoblock, Enagua, and Gringa among others.

Schargorodsky additionally produces her own products, such as stickers, prints, and even adorably packaged artisanal soaps which she sells at ferias such as Juntas (sensing a pattern here?). She will soon release a book entitled El Gato de la Abuela (The Grandmother’s Cat), published in Spain by Tres Tigros Tristes.

I would also recommend following her on Instagram, as her designs are an explosion of color that can brighten up your feed no end.

(Photo via Josefina Schargorodsky).
(Photo via Josefina Schargorodsky).

 

 

Please note that The Bubble accepts no culpability for you bankrupting yourself. Happy browsing!